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Enrollment

 

Technical Standards for the WSUSOM

A candidate for the MD degree must possess abilities and skills which include those that are observational, communicational, motor, intellectual-conceptual (integrative and quantitative), and behavioral and social.

Once applicants with disabilities are accepted to a medical school, the school must provide certain accommodations to those persons so that they can enjoy the same services, benefits, and educational and training opportunities as those without disabilities. The law requires “reasonable” accommodation, but an accommodation cannot alter the essential elements of a course. Similarly, the technical standards of a program cannot be altered. The use of a trained intermediary is not acceptable in many clinical situations in that it implies that a candidate’s judgment must be mediated by someone else’s power of selection and observation. Any student who believes they have a disability should report to the Wayne State University School of Medicine Office of Student Disability Services for determination of the disability and associated accommodation. Any student who believes they have a disability, please refer to the procedures associated with the Wayne State University Student Disability Services in this document.

Observation

The candidate must be able to acquire a defined level of required information as presented through demonstrations and experiences in the basic sciences, including but not limited to information conveyed through physiologic and pharmacological demonstrations in animals, microbiological cultures and microscopic images of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathological states. Furthermore, a candidate must be able:

  • To observe a patient accurately, at a distance, and close at hand, to acquire information from written documents, and to visualize information as presented in images from paper, films, slides or video.
  • To interpret x-ray and other graphic images, and digital or analog representations of physiologic phenomenon (such as EKGs) with or without the use of assistive devices. Such observation and information acquisition necessitates the functional use of visual, auditory and somatic sensation while being enhanced by the functional use of other sensory modalities. In any case where a candidate’s ability to observe or acquire information through these sensory modalities is compromised, the candidate must demonstrate alternative means and/or abilities to acquire and demonstrate the essential information conveyed in this fashion. If the alternatives are acceptable, it is expected that obtaining and using such alternate means and/or abilities shall be the responsibility of the student.

Communication

A candidate must be able to speak, to hear and to observe patients by sight in order to elicit information, describe changes in mood, activity and posture, and perceive nonverbal communications. A candidate must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Communication includes speech, reading and writing. The candidate must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written form with all members of the health care team.

Motor Skills

It is required that a candidate possess the motor skills necessary to directly perform palpation, percussion, auscultation and other diagnostic procedures. The candidate must be able to execute motor movements reasonably required to provide general and emergency medical care such as airway management, placement of intravenous catheters, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, application of pressure to control bleeding, suturing of wounds and the performance of simple obstetrical maneuvers. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and functional use of the senses of touch and vision.

Intellectual-Conceptual (Integrative and Quantitative) Abilities

The candidate must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze, integrate and synthesize. In addition, the candidate must be able to comprehend three- dimensional relationships and to understand the spatial relationships of structures. Problem solving, the critical skill demanded of physicians, requires all of these intellectual abilities. The candidate must be able to perform these problem-solving skills in a timely fashion.

Behavioral and Social Attributes

The candidate must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of his/her intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients. The candidate must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress. He/she must be able to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility, and to learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of patients. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest and motivation are all personal qualities that will be assessed during the admissions and educational processes.

 

Criminal Background Check and Michigan Public Sex Offender Registry Check Guidelines

Purpose

In an effort to enhance the safety and well-being of patients and to ensure that students can become state licensed physicians1, the American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has recommended to medical schools the need to conduct criminal background checks on all matriculating and enrolled medical students. In addition, no individual who is on the Michigan Public Sex Offender Registry is allowed to work with or be in the proximity of children.

Policy

  1. All matriculating students must have a criminal background check prior to Year 1 registration.
  2. All enrolled students promoted from year 1 to year 2 and year 3 to year 4 are required to complete and submit an attestation form certifying that they have not been convicted of a felony.
  3. Prior to registration for year 3, students are required to submit information for a criminal background check that the school will have performed by an outside vendor. Additionally, Year 3 students will be checked against the Michigan Public Sex Offender Registry (PSOR). Any student, who either self-reports a felony and/or one is revealed by the criminal background check, will follow the review process and will not be allowed to register for coursework until approval is granted by the Chair of the Criminal History Review Committee (CHRC). Any student who is on the PSOR list will be immediately removed from the clinical setting and placed on administrative leave until their enrollment status is determined.
  4. Any student whose background check contains a felony conviction will be referred to the CHRC. This committee will review the felony conviction report and allow the student an opportunity to address any erroneous information and clarify the report.

Process

  1. The School of Medicine will convene a Criminal History Review Committee (CHRC) that will review and respond to reports of felony convictions and/or a student’s registration on the Michigan Public Sex Offender Registry. The Chair of the Promotions Committee will chair the CHRC. The committee will consist of the following members: the associate dean of undergraduate medical education, the assistant dean of student affairs and career development, and a faculty member currently appointed to the promotions committee. The CHRC is staffed by the chief administrative officer of the Office of Medical Education.
  2. Applicants who are offered a spot in the incoming class will be required to obtain a criminal background check at their own expense using the services of Certiphi Screening Incorporated. Certiphi will create a Wayne State University profile that will only screen for convictions and conviction-equivalent adjudications/felonies. When the background check is completed, Certiphi will release the information to the applicant for review. Once the applicant’s review is completed, the applicant must release the report to Wayne State University School of Medicine.
  3. If upon completion of the background check report, an applicant is found to have a felony conviction, the report will be reviewed by the CHRC. In the case of current student who self-reports a felony on their attestation sheet, the CHRC will order a criminal background check for review.
  4. Applicants and students with reported felony convictions will meet with the CHRC. The applicant/student will have an opportunity to provide written documentation to respond to the report. Applicants/students will have 5 business days following notification from the medical school of the felony to provide any information about the circumstances surrounding the felony conviction. The CHRC review will include the severity of the felony conviction, age that the felony occurred and the time that has elapsed since the conviction.
  5. If the CHRC finds the severity of the felony impacts the applicant’s ability to meet the technical standards because they will not be able to participate in the clinical portion of the medical education program, the CHRC will recommend the Office of Admissions rescind the offer for a spot in the medical school. Current students whose severity of felony conviction will not allow them to progress in the medical education program will be referred to the School of Medicine’s Promotions Committee with a recommendation for dismissal.
  6. To maintain confidentiality, a student’s felony conviction report and any supporting documentation will be retained and stored in a secure manner. The file will be kept in the office of Records and Registration separate from student academic files. Upon graduation, withdrawal, or dismissal, the file will be destroyed.

1 Guidelines obtained from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Resources website: http://www.michigan.gov/mdch

 

Compliance with Health Standards

In order to participate in the medical education program and co-curricular programs, a medical student must be compliant with the School of Medicine health standards. Any questions regarding this policy or procedures should be directed to the Medical Student Health Officer at healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.

Required Communicable Disease Vaccinations

All students are strongly encouraged to keep personal copies of all materials submitted to the school of medicine documenting their compliance with these requirements.

As a medical students and future members of the healthcare workforce it is important for WSU School of Medicine students to provide documentation that they have had all necessary vaccinations or have evidence of immunity from specific diseases. This documentation is essential not only to show that the student is protected, but also to protect those patients with whom they will come in contact during clinical rotations, visits to clinical facilities, and in the course of volunteer or relief programs. This documentation is also required by our affiliated clinical teaching facilities. The specific requirements for vaccination/immunity documentation are listed below. These requirements are based upon current recommendations from the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC), the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH), and other expert authorities. This information and the requirements must be reviewed very carefully to ensure compliance and should be shared with students’ healthcare providers as needed.

Students must provide the specific dates of vaccinations or titers and if antibody titers are drawn, then copies of the actual laboratory reports must be provided to the Student Health Officer for inclusion in the students’ health files.

Annual influenza vaccinations and TB testing will be offered here at the School of Medicine at the appropriate times of each school year.

Any questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the Medical Student Health Officer at healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.

Required Vaccinations/Evidence of Immunity Policy

As medical students and future members of the healthcare workforce it is important for WSU School of Medicine students to provide documentation that they have had all necessary vaccinations or have evidence of immunity from specific diseases. This documentation is essential not only to show that the student is protected, but also to protect those patients with whom they will come in contact during clinical rotations, visits to clinical facilities, and in the course of volunteer or relief programs. This documentation is also required by our affiliated clinical teaching facilities. The specific requirements for vaccination/immunity documentation are listed below. These requirements are based upon current recommendations from the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC), the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH), other expert authorities, and requirements of institutions hosting visiting students. This information and the requirements must be reviewed very carefully by the Medical Student Health Officer Assistant to ensure compliance and should be shared with students’ healthcare providers as needed.

Students must provide the specific dates of vaccinations. If antibody titers are drawn, then copies of the actual laboratory reports also must be provided to the Medical Student Health Officer Assistant for inclusion in the students’ health files

Annual influenza vaccinations and TB testing will be offered at the School of Medicine at the appropriate times of each school year.

Any questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the Medical Student Health Officer at healthofficer@med.wayne.edu. All inquiries will be received and addressed by the Medical Student Health Officer Assistant. The Medical Student Health Officer Assistant is responsible for reviewing the health records of and contacting individual students. S/he is a member of the medical field but is not involved in the academic assessment or promotion of medical students. The Medical Student Health Officer is responsible for all policies related to compliance with health standards; but does not review individual student health records.

Required documentation of vaccinations and evidence of immunity:

(Please note: For all antibody titers, copies of the actual laboratory reports MUST be submitted for inclusion in the student’s health file.)

  1. Tdap (Tetanus toxoid, reduced diptheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine) – This is a somewhat different formulation than the DTaP or DPT vaccinations that most of our students received in infancy/early childhood and it is also different than the Td (commonly “Tetanus shot”) that many may have received as adolescents or adults for tetanus prophylaxis for wounds. The Tdap has the standard dose of tetanus toxoid, a reduced dose of diptheria and an acellular booster for pertussis (“whooping cough”). With the resurgence and increasing incidence of pertussis, the CDC and other authorities have recommended that all healthcare providers who have not received a Tdap as an adult (i.e. at age 16 or older) should receive one, regardless of the time since their last Td vaccination. The hospitals in which our students participate in clinical rotations are requiring explicit documentation of the adult pertussis vaccination in order for students to be in their facilities
  2. Measles and mumps – Some of the clinical sites available to students for clerkships and electives require medical students to have quantitative measles and mumps antibody titers indicating they are immune to these infections. Therefore, the School of Medicine requires evidence of immunity. We also request documentation of two doses of these vaccinations.
  3. Rubella – Some of the clinical sites available to students for clerkships and electives require medical students to have quantitative rubella antibody titers indicating they are immune to this infection. Therefore, the School of Medicine requires evidence of immunity. We also request documentation of at least one dose of this vaccination.
  4. Varicella – All students should have a quantitative varicella antibody titer drawn to assess their immunity to this infection. If a student has a history of receiving the vaccination, we request documentation of two doses of this vaccination. A history of having “had the disease” is not adequate documentation of immunity to varicella.
  5. Hepatitis B – The majority of clinical sites require documentation of three doses of this vaccination and a quantitative antibody titer (anti-HBs) indicating response to the immunizations. Therefore the School of Medicine has the same requirement. Students must have evidence of three doses and immunity to Hepatitis B. (Please note that additional blood work and potential re-vaccination will be required in the event that immunity is not documented after the primary series. Students should consult with their healthcare provider in this event.)

Annual Influenza Vaccination Policy

WSU School of Medicine students are required to receive an influenza vaccination each year. This annual requirement should be completed as soon as possible after the vaccine becomes available, but in any case no later than November 30th each year. Influenza vaccinations are essential in reducing the students’ risk of contracting influenza, reducing the risk to their family members, and most importantly to reduce the risk of influenza among those patients with whom they will come in contact during clinical rotations, visits to clinical facilities, and in the course of volunteer or relief programs. Documentation that each student has received an annual influenza vaccination is also required by our affiliated clinical teaching facilities. This policy is based upon current recommendations from the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC), the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH), and the requirements of our affiliated clinical sites.

Annual influenza vaccination opportunities will be offered here at the School of Medicine at the appropriate times of each school year, typically in the late summer or early fall. Students must provide specific documentation to the Student Health Officer Assistant of their influenza vaccinations if they receive them from a health care provider outside of the School of Medicine programs. This documentation will be placed in the students’ confidential health files at the school.

Any questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the Medical Student Health Officer at healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.

Annual TB Screening Policy

  1. Medical students, like all other healthcare personnel, must undergo tuberculosis (TB) screening on an annual basis during time periods determined by the School of Medicine and its affiliated teaching hospitals and clinical facilities.
  2. A student’s failure to comply with the TB screening requirements of the School of Medicine may result in that student being excluded from participating in training or other activities at those facilities in accordance with their individual institutional infection control policies
  3. Upon completion of TB screening, the student will be asked to sign a release allowing the Wayne State University School of Medicine and/or its agents to release information regarding the results of this testing to affiliated health care facilities where students are participating in clinical educational activities which require confirmation that the students have completed the testing mandated by those facilities.
  4. TB screening programs will be offered here at the School of Medicine according to the following general schedule:
    1. Year 1 student screening will be scheduled in the fall of Year 1 (baseline screening)
    2. Year 2 student screening will be scheduled in the spring of Year 2 (in preparation for beginning clinical rotations in Year 3)
    3. Year 3 student screening will be scheduled in the spring of Year 3 (in preparation for continuing clinical rotations in Year 4)
    4. Students may choose to have TB screening done at outside medical facilities, but must then provide the School of Medicine with documentation from those facilities of the screening results
  5. TB screening will be undertaken according to the population to which each student belongs as follows:
    1. Students with no prior history of a positive Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) nor a positive Interferon-Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) blood test for TB Infection
      →Should undergo routine TST. (Alternative would be IGRA testing)
    2. Students who have received bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG)vaccination in childhood
      →Should undergo routine TST. (Alternative would be IGRA testing)
    3. Students known to have latent TB (as evidenced by a history of a past positive TST or IGRA)
      →Must have evidence of one negative chest x-ray and should submit a yearly TB symptom survey.
      (Students will need to submit a copy of the actual negative chest x-ray report to be placed in their medical folder at the School of Medicine. Students are strongly encouraged to keep a personal copy of their negative x-ray report to avoid unnecessary repeat chest x-rays)
  6. Students should be aware that other institutions and medical facilities where they may apply to undertake electives and other training as a medical student may have different policies for TB screening that are not under the control of the School of Medicine.
  7. Any questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the Medical Student Health Officer at healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.

Respirator Fit Testing Policy

All medical students are required to be fit tested to wear a 3M—N95 Respirator before beginning Year 3 clinical rotations, generally in the late winter or early spring of Year 2. The fit testing program is coordinated and scheduled by the School of Medicine and takes place at the school. This fit testing is required by our clinical training sites as part of their infection control policies and/or respiratory protection programs in compliance with the Federal Government’s OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.134.

N95 Respirators provide protection against aerosols and droplets that might contain bacteria, viruses, or other pathogens. They are required for personnel who are caring for specific patients such as those with tuberculosis or those with influenza who are undergoing procedures that might generate aerosols—for which regular surgical masks do not provide protection. N95 Respirators may also need to be worn by certain healthcare personnel who require a higher level of protection or by all personnel during times of a serious outbreak of an airborne infectious disease.

Students who decline respirator fit testing may be subject to one or more of the following actions that may be taken by our clinical training sites:

  1. Exclusion from participating in some or all clinical training activities at their sites; or
  2. Requiring the student to use and/or purchase for use a Powered Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR), which consists of a mask, headgear/hood, and battery powered blower unit (if available); or
  3. Other restrictions imposed by the clinical training site(s) in accordance with their individual institutional infection control policies or respiratory protection programs.

Questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the Medical Student Health Officer at healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.

Refusal of Required Immunizations and Health Screenings Policy

The various affiliated hospitals and other clinical training sites where Wayne State University School of Medicine students are placed for their clinical rotations have stringent requirements that all members of their healthcare workforce are required to receive specific immunizations and/or have evidence of immunity from specific diseases and undergo periodic health testing in order to receive instruction in clinical settings and perform the essential functions of a medical student. This immunization requirement/documentation is essential not only to show that the students are protected, but also to protect those patients with whom they will come in contact during clinical rotations, visits to clinical facilities, and in the course of volunteer or relief programs. This immunization requirement/documentation is also required by our affiliated clinical teaching facilities before any medical student is allowed into their institutions.

These requirements are very specific and are based upon current recommendations from the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC), the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH), and other expert authorities. The requirements are posted on the School of Medicine website, but are subject to revision at any time as dictated by changes originating from regulatory bodies, clinical training sites, expert recommendations, changes in public health conditions, and advancements in medical science.

The WSU SOM recognizes that a student may want to request an exemption from any required immunizations and/or from providing required evidence of immunity from specific diseases or from undergoing required periodic health testing either for his/her own health reasons or because these requirements conflict with his or her religious beliefs or practices. However, because these immunization requirements are imposed by our various affiliated hospitals and other clinical training sites, and because clinical training is an essential element of completing the requirements for a medical degree, such an exemption cannot be granted if the failure to meet these requirements would prevent the student from performing the essential functions of a medical student and from fulfilling the curricular requirements of the academic program.

It should be noted that failure to meet the requirements for vaccination and/or health testing will likely result in the student not being permitted to train in affiliated hospitals and other clinical facilities, thereby preventing the student from completing the required curricular activities needed to receive the Medical Doctor (M.D.) degree.

Any questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the Medical Student Health Officer at healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.

Needlestick and other Exposures Blood/Body Fluids Policy

During the course of a medical student’s education, he or she will come into contact with occupational hazards as a natural consequence of caring for sick patients. Medical students have an increased risk for injuries due to needle sticks or contact with other sharp instruments since they may not yet be skilled in the procedures being performed. At all times, if a student is uncomfortable performing an assigned procedure because they feel either that their skills are inadequate or that they need more supervision/guidance than is available, then that student MUST refrain from doing the procedure.

Never attempt a procedure you are uncomfortable performing.

It is the obligation of the School of Medicine to formally educate its students regarding the prevention of occupational injuries. In addition, the school has developed programs by which students who are injured or exposed to blood or body fluids in the course of their training have the knowledge to properly seek care. Such programs are formally presented to students in the first, second and third years of the medical school curriculum. In the event that a student is stuck with a needle or other sharp instrument, or sustains exposure to a body fluid on mucus membranes or non-intact skin, the student must report this to their senior resident, attending physician, or supervising faculty member immediately. As detailed below, a written report must be completed detailing the circumstances of the exposure and the student must notify the School of Medicine’s Medical Student Health Officer of the reported incident via email at: healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.

Incidents occurring on the School of Medicine Campus or while participating in University-sponsored activities

  1. Enrolled students experiencing an injury, exposure to blood/body fluids or non-personal illness (excludes personal illnesses such as, but not limited to, flu, cold/sinus, etc.) while attending class or participating in University-sponsored activities, such as co-curricular programs, shall receive initial treatment at an University-authorized medical facility as noted below:
    1. EMERGENCY ISSUES:
      1. Detroit Receiving Hospital – ER
      2. Henry Ford Hospital– ER
    2. NON-EMERGENCY ISSUES:
      1. University Health Center (UHC)-4K
      2. Henry Ford Medical Center – Harbortown
  2. Only the initial treatment/visit necessary for an injury or a school-related illness requiring immediate medical attention will be covered by this policy. The student is responsible for any subsequent treatment.
  3. All injured students must complete a short Wayne State University Report of Injury form. This form is available online at: http://idrm.wayne.edu/risk/files/rofi.pdf.
  4. NOTE: The Report of Injury form must be submitted within 48 hours of the injury. Completed forms should be submitted to the Medical Student Health Officer at: healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.
  5. The Medical Student Health Officer will forward the form to the WSU Office of Risk Management on the student’s behalf.
  6. The WSU Office of Risk Management will cover the expenses of the first emergency department visit as long as the Report of Injury has been submitted to the Medical Student Health Officer within the prescribed 48 hour post injury timeframe.
  7. Any expenses incurred (co-pays, deductibles) based on a failure to adhere to the above process will be the responsibility of the student.
  8. After the initial evaluation and treatment encounter at the clinical institution, the student will subsequently follow-up with their personal physician using their own health insurance coverage within five days of the incident.
  9. Any questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the Medical Student Health Officer at healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.

Incidents occurring at affiliated Clinical Site institutions or while on a “Home” required or elective rotation

The medical school has established relationships through the affiliation agreements with all of our Clinical Site facilities (hospitals and ambulatory sites). Specific policies must be followed when an exposure or potential exposure has occurred:

  1. A student who sustains an exposure to blood and/or body fluids in the course of a clinical assignment at any of our affiliated clinical institutions should immediately seek care in the designated department of that facility. These departments are listed for each institution on the back of the laminated cards that are distributed at Year 3 Orientation. This list should be kept for potential use during Year 4.
  2. If the incident occurs outside of the regular business hours of the institutions designated department the student should receive initial evaluation and treatment in that institution’s Emergency Department.
  3. A student who suffers an injury or exposure while on a “Home” required or elective rotation that is not taking place at an affiliated clinical site facility (e.g. a rotation taking place in a faculty physician’s office) should seek care in the nearest emergency department.
  4. All injured students must complete a short Wayne State University Report of Injury form. This form is available online at: http://idrm.wayne.edu/risk/files/rofi.pdf.
  5. NOTE: The Report of Injury form must be submitted within 48 hours of the injury. Completed forms should be submitted to the Medical Student Health Officer at: healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.
  6. The Medical Student Health Officer will forward the form to the WSU Office of Risk Management on the student’s behalf.
  7. The WSU Office of Risk Management will cover the expenses of the first emergency department visit as long as the Report of Injury has been submitted to the Medical Student Health Officer within the prescribed 48 hour post injury timeframe.
  8. When completing paperwork in the emergency department, students should show their laminated card that ensures that Wayne State University will be responsible for the professional and facility charges related to the initial visit for evaluation and treatment in the department.
  9. Any expenses incurred (co-pays, deductibles) based on a failure to adhere to the above process will be the responsibility of the student.
  10. After the initial evaluation and treatment encounter at the clinical institution, the student will subsequently follow-up with their personal physician using their own health insurance coverage within five days of the incident.
  11. Any questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the Medical Student Health Officer at healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.

Infection control/Blood-Borne Pathogens Infection Policy

  1. The Wayne State University School of Medicine (SOM) is dedicated to educating its students in the provision of health care of the highest quality. It abides by professional values that recognize the primacy of patient welfare and the need to reduce risks to the health of both patients and students within the framework of outstanding medical education activities.
  2. The SOM is firmly committed to educating all Wayne State University medical students in universal precautions and in doing so before the start of their clerkship years. In addition, the SOM is committed to reemphasizing and reinforcing universal precautions training regularly over the course of those years.
  3. The SOM believes it is important to annually review this policy and revise/update it as necessary to reflect the current level of science and national guidelines with respect to blood-borne pathogens.
  4. Every student must strictly adhere to universal precautions, including appropriate hand washing, using recommended protective barriers, and taking meticulous care in the use and disposal of needles and other sharp instruments when on any clinical assignment (including, but not limited to, clerkships, electives, and volunteer clinical activities) whether at Wayne State University affiliated hospitals and clinical facilities or at non-affiliated or outside institutions.
  5. The SOM follows the current recommendations of the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC), the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH), and other expert authorities in requiring that any person (including medical students) who performs tasks involving contact with blood, blood-contaminated body fluids, other body fluids, needles, or sharp instruments must be vaccinated against hepatitis B and their response to vaccination must be documented by obtaining appropriate antibody titers.
  6. It is the duty and responsibility of any student who has risks for a blood-borne pathogen infection to be tested and KNOW their own status with respect to HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C.
  7. The SOM is committed to advising and providing continued career guidance to any and all students who know, or suspect they have, a blood-borne pathogen infection. As such, the SOM requires any student who knows or suspects that they have a blood-borne pathogen infection to report their status to the School of Medicine’s Medical Student Health Officer so that the student can be further counseled.
    1. The SOM requires students who know that they have a blood-borne pathogen infection to obtain a formal consultation from an Infectious Disease specialist with specific experience and expertise in the issues of health care providers with these conditions. The SOM can provide assistance in identifying such specialists.
    2. In addition to following universal precautions, students with a known blood-borne pathogen infection are required to seek expert guidance, as noted above, before participating in exposure-prone procedures.
  8. As is true for patients, SOM students have a right to privacy with respect to their personal health information including their blood-borne pathogen status. This information will be protected in accordance with the applicable SOM and University privacy policies and as required by state and federal laws.
  9. If a blood-borne exposure occurs, however, in which there is a reasonable chance that blood was transmitted from the student to the patient, then the student has the personal responsibility and the SOM requires that student to immediately report their blood-borne pathogen status to their supervisory attending physician so that appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis may be undertaken on behalf of the patient. Similarly, should a blood-borne exposure occur from the patient to any student, the student is required to immediately report the exposure to the supervisory attending physician so that appropriate evaluation and post-exposure prophylaxis may be undertaken on behalf of the student. Additional information concerning the procedures to be followed by students who are potentially exposed to blood-borne pathogens can be found in the Health and Wellness section of the Office of Student Affairs and Career Development web pages available on the SOM website.
  10. Medical students who believe that their blood-borne pathogen status is or might be a disability that could impact their medical school performance and might require accommodations in their medical school training are encouraged to consult with a disability specialist in the Wayne State University Student Disability Services (SDS) office. Detailed information about SDS, the Americans with Disability Act (ADA), SDS policies and procedures, documentation guidelines, and types of accommodations can be found on the SDS website at http://studentdisability.wayne.edu/index.php.
  11. Any questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the Medical Student Health Officer at healthofficer@med.wayne.edu.

Acute Medical Events Policy

Wayne State University School of Medicine strives to create a safe environment for all faculty, students and visitors.

  1. If someone becomes acutely ill or is injured and requires intervention:
    1. Remain calm and keep aisles, stairs, and doors clear of obstructions.
    2. Do not block doors.
    3. If the individual feels able to independently pursue medical care for their illness or injury and does not appear to be in any imminent danger, they should be allowed and encouraged to immediately seek this care. Students should report to the Office of Student Affairs for assistance.
    4. If, however, there is any doubt whatsoever about the individual’s ability to independently pursue medical care for their illness or injury, then the WSU Campus Police should be contacted immediately at 313-577-2222 and they should be advised of the individual’s location and the nature of their illness/injury.
      1. Do not move the victim unless there is an immediate life threatening emergency
      2. Comfort the victim and reassure them that medical assistance is on the way.
      3. Remain on the scene to assist WSU Campus Police/Medical Service Providers with pertinent information about the incident.
    5. If the emergency occurs during non-business hours, please call WSU Campus Police at 313-577-2222 for assistance.
  2. To Stop Bleeding:
    1. Apply direct pressure to the wound.
    2. Maintain steady pressure.
    3. Elevate limbs that are bleeding.
  3. Burns and Chemical Burns:
    1. Remove victim from source of the burn if it is safe to do so. If chemical is involved, wear gloves or other protective gear.
    2. Cool the burn with large amounts of water. For chemical burns, remove contaminated clothing.
    3. Loosely cover burn with dry or sterile dressing.
    4. For electrical burns, make sure power source is OFF before making contact with the victim. If the victim is unconscious, do not move unless there is immediate danger. Loosely cover burn with dry or sterile dressing.
  4. CPR/Heart Attack
    1. Call WSU Police immediately at 313-577-2222.
    2. Automated electronic defibrillators (AEDs) are available at locations throughout the School of Medicine buildings to be employed by those trained in their use.
    3. The WSU Police also have an AED available for response.
    4. If you have been trained by WSU Police or in an American Red Cross approved program, proceed with CPR.

Chronic Medical Conditions Policy

Wayne State University School of Medicine strives to create a safe environment for all faculty, students and visitors. Academically, the administration, faculty, and staff want to provide students the best opportunity to meet the Wayne State University School of Medicine qualifications, including; essential academic, technical, and institutional standards. In order to achieve these goals, a Chronic Medical Condition Policy was developed.

  1. For the Student:
    1. Upon matriculation to medical school students must complete a Health Certification form. The form must be approved by your physician and submitted no later than June 30th of the academic year a student starts medical school.
    2. If a chronic condition is diagnosed or exacerbated during medical school and is impeding your ability to meet the academic, technical and institutional standards, it is strongly recommended you contact your counselor or the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs.
    3. If the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs determines the student’s condition is impacting the student’s ability to meet the academic, technical and/or institutional stands, the student may be required to provide medical documentation that verifies that the student is fit for duty and can participate actively with all medical school requirements.
    4. Any student who feels that their chronic medical condition might require accommodations in their learning environment or during examinations should consult with a Disability Specialist in the Student Disability Services (SDS) office on main campus The SDS office is located on the first floor of the David Adamany Undergraduate Library at 5155 Gullen Mall and can be contacted at 313-577-1851. Office hours are Monday-Friday 8:30-5:00 with extended evening hours on Monday and Thursday evenings until 7:00 during the fall and winter.
  2. For Medical School Administration:
    1. Maintain the University academic standards, which include establishing essential functions, abilities, skills, knowledge and standards for courses, programs, services, jobs and activities or facilities and to evaluate students on this basis.
    2. If a student approaches an administrator with a chronic condition that may inhibit their ability to take examinations or perform other technical and institutional requirements, they should be immediately referred to their counselor or the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs.
    3. Have appropriate staff discuss students and the nature of the students’ medical illness, given signed consent, in order to implement approved accommodations, particularly instructional accommodations.
    4. Maintain confidentiality and only inform those who need to know in order to maintain student and patient safety.

Enrollment Status

In general, each student is considered enrolled from the time of matriculation into medical school until the time of graduation and must maintain a student status eligibility category. Enrolled students are considered to be in good academic standing. In some circumstances enrollment may be interrupted temporarily or be terminated for a number of reasons, including:

Dismissal

Dismissal is a permanent, involuntary removal of a student from medical school. Dismissal can occur in two ways. A student can be administratively dismissed or dismissed by the Promotions Committee.

Administrative Dismissal

Administrative dismissals occur when a student has failed to meet the academic standards of the School of Medicine as approved by the Promotions Committee in one of the following ways:

  1. A student does not complete the medical education program within 7 years of the year of matriculation
  2. In Year 1 and 2:
    1. A student does not begin and/or complete repeated coursework as scheduled
    2. A student does not achieve a grade of satisfactory in a repeated course or a repeated Pathophysiology unit
    3. A student does not pass USMLE Step 1 within 1 year beginning on June 30 of the year of completion of Year 2 coursework.
    4. A student violates professional standards.
  3. In Year 3 and 4:
    1. A student fails any two required clerkships/Year 4 required clinical rotations
    2. A student has two clinical evaluation failures of a Year 3 Clerkship/Year 4 required clinical rotation or a second clinical evaluation failure of a single clerkship/Year 4 required rotation.
    3. A student fails any single required clerkship three times by failing the subject exam on the third attempt.
    4. A student does not pass USMLE Step 2 CK or CS within 1 year after the completion of Year 4 coursework.
    5. A student violates professional standards.

Students administratively dismissed by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education for academic reasons can appeal to the Vice Dean for Medical Education. Students deciding to appeal must have a full appeal letter submitted to the Office of Records and Registration within 10 business days of the dismissal notification. The Vice Dean for Medical Education, as the Chair of the Promotions Committee, is the final arbiter of administrative dismissals for the School of Medicine. Students deciding to appeal the decision of the Promotions Committee Chair must submit a written request to the Wayne State University Office of the Provost. http://undergrad.wayne.edu/appeal.php

A student who is administratively dismissed due to failing a repeated course, failing an NBME exam for the third time or a second clinical failure cannot appeal this final grade to the Provost prior to the School of Medicine administrative dismissal procedures. The appeal process for administrative dismissals supersedes the normal grade appeal policy contained elsewhere in this manual, as this final failing grade directly leads to the administrative dismissal. A student can, however, in this special circumstance, include a grade appeal as a part of his/her appeal of the dismissal to the Vice Dean for Medical Education (submitted to the Office of Records and Registration). Such a “bundled” appeal can then have a final appeal to the Provost (as a part of the dismissal appeal process) if the appeal of the grade/resulting dismissal is denied by the Vice Dean for Medical Education.

Dismissal Action of the Promotions Committee

Students can also be dismissed by the Promotions Committee. This action would occur if the Promotions Committee determines that a student’s overall academic performance, which includes the student’s overall professionalism performance, has fallen below the School’s standards. A determination to dismiss a student by the Promotions Committee can be made at any time in the academic year or during the student’s career in medical school. A request for consideration of student dismissal by the Promotions Committee can be made by the Dean, Vice Dean for Medical Education, Chair of the Promotions Committee, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Career Development, the Assistant Dean for Pre-Clerkship Education, the Assistant Dean for Clinical Education, the Professionalism Committee, or the Criminal History Review Committee.

In all instances where a dismissal is being considered by the Promotions Committee, the student will be given notice and an opportunity for a hearing in front of the Promotions Committee before a final decision is made.

Withdrawal

All students who have been academically dismissed, whether administratively or by the Promotions Committee, are given up to 10 business days too voluntarily and permanently withdraw. The offer to withdraw becomes null and void if the student elects to request reconsideration of the dismissal to the Chair of the Promotions Committee.

Withdrawal is a permanent, voluntary termination as a medical student initiated by the student him/herself. Students wishing to withdraw must submit a written request to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Career Development, including in the request the statement that the student understands that withdrawal is voluntary and permanent. A student cannot avoid disciplinary action or academic hearing procedures through a request to withdraw. However, the Promotions Committee may allow a student to withdraw prior to the completion of such hearings or an action to dismiss.

Students who are dismissed for academic misconduct do not have the option of withdrawal.

Leaves of Absence

A leave of absence (LOA) is a temporary interruption of enrollment status. For a thorough explanation of the leave of absence policy and its impact on a student’s status or financial aid, please review the policy posted at: http://studentaffairs.med.wayne.edu/loa_process.php

At any time during medical school, a student may request a leave of absence. All requests for leaves of absence must be submitted in writing and signed and dated. The request should be submitted on the Leave of Absence Request form to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs.

To obtain a leave, please review the leave of absence policy in full. After careful review, please set up an appointment with your assigned counselor to discuss the leave of absence request. During the meeting with their counselor, a student will complete the Leave of Absence Request form. This completed form must be signed off by the Office of Financial Aid for all students.

Exception to written, signed and dated requests; If unforeseen circumstances prevent a student from providing a prior written request the School of Medicine may grant the student’s request for a leave of absence. The School of Medicine must document this decision and collect the written request at a later date.

There are five types of LOA’s. The first is an administrative LOA, which a student is placed on by the medical school administration as described below under Administrative (ALOA). Students may also request an LOA for personal, medical, education, or financial aid reasons. Leaves of absence are approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Career Development. A formal written request for a leave of absence must be made to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Career Development. A leave of absence is discretionary by the Assistant Dean and will only be granted where reasonably necessary. Once placed on a leave of absence, the student remains on leave until they are approved to return and begin course work. A leave of absence does not retroactively nullify course failure.

All leaves of absence are part of the student’s official record. The leave type, start and end date are entered into the Wayne State University School of Medicine information system (Banner) and recorded on the official transcript. The leave of absence information is recorded in the MSPE (Medical Student Performance Evaluation) when applying for residency and reported to the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges) Student Records System.

Leave of Absences count toward the School of Medicine’s 7-year limit for completion of all M.D. degree requirements. The exception to this requirement is approved educational leaves of absence.

Any leave of absence from the MD program will be included in the maximum time frame calculation when determining Satisfactory Academic Progress for Title IV financial aid eligibility purposes.

Once a leave of absence is approved, Wayne State University School of Medicine has a reasonable expectation that you, the student will return to the MD program. This is recorded on the Leave of Absence Request Form.

The number of days in the leave of absence will be counted with the first day of the initial leave of absence within a 12-month period.

The 12-month period begins on the first day of the initial leave of absence. The duration of a leave of absence is not to exceed one year.

Students placed on an ANY leave of absence will be considered withdrawn from coursework and will be reported to NSLDS (National Student Loan Data System) as withdrawn.

Students who do not return from a leave will be dismissed from medical school at the point in which the leave was granted and will be reported as withdrawn.

Failure to return from a leave may impact your Direct Loan, Perkins, and/or Loans to Disadvantaged Students repayment terms.

Most federal loans will enter repayment once you withdraw from school. The grace period on your loan is a set period of time after you graduate, leave school or drop below half-time enrollment before you must begin repayment on your loan. Not all federal student loans have a grace period. For most loans, interest will accrue during your grace period.

For more information on loan repayment and grace periods, please visit: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/understand#when-begin

Administrative (ALOA). An administrative leave of absence is a WSUSOM-initiated leave of absence due extended delay in taking the United State Medical Licensing Examinations (USMLE), failure of a United States Medical Licensing Examinations (USMLE) or other academic/professionalism reasons. A student may also be placed on an administrative leave of absence while under investigation by the Professionalism Committee.

Educational (ELOA). Only students who have passed all attempted courses/clerkships and the USMLE exams on the first attempt and are in good academic standing in medical school will qualify for an ELOA. An ELOA will only be considered if the student is enrolled in a formal degree granting program, or NIH or other externally funded fellowship/research program. Dual enrollment in the school of medicine medical education program and a second degree granting program is not allowed. A student’s written request should specify the educational program of study and the beginning and end dates of the leave. Supporting documentation indicating acceptance into the other educational program must be submitted. ELOAs are granted a year at a time and a reapplication must be made for each additional year of leave. Proof of satisfactory progress in the other education program is required for consideration of an extended ELOA. In order to return from an approved ELOA, the student must confirm the expected date of return as outlined in the leave letter before returning to his/her medical studies.

Personal (PLOA). A student’s written request should specify the beginning and end dates of the leave. Students must also complete the Leave Checklist found on the Student Affairs website http://studentaffairs.med.wayne.edu/loa_process.php . In order to return from an approved PLOA, the student must confirm the expected date of return as outlined in the leave letter before returning to his/her medical studies.

Medical (MLOA). A student’s written request for a MLOA requires authorization from a licensed health care professional certified to treat the specific illness, indicating that the student is not able to perform the functions and responsibilities of his/her medical studies for a specified period of time. The certification letter must state the beginning and end date for which the MLOA is deemed to be medically necessary. Students must also complete the Leave Request form found on the Student Affairs website http://studentaffairs.med.wayne.edu/loa_process.php In order to return from an approved MLOA, the student’s health care provider must affirm in writing that the student is fit to return to his/her medical studies. Such notification must be received as outlined in the leave letter before the anticipated return to school. Health providers who are family members may not provide the certification letter.

Financial (FLOA). A student may be placed on an FLOA if they are unable to pay tuition and fees as required by University policies. Account balances also result in a university hold that will prevent a student from participating in scheduling and registration for medical school.

Students Remediating USMLE Step 1 Failure (Special Matriculation)

Students who are remediating USMLE Step 1 failure must meet with the Office of Learning and Teaching and their counselor to determine next steps. Students have a choice between being enrolled in a “Special Matriculation” Course or taking an Administrative Leave until they successfully passed Step 1. If they choose “Special Matriculation”, they will be enrolled as a part-time Year 2 student in a Step 1 directed study course at one credit hour per month until December 31 or until they pass Step 1, whichever comes first. Enrollment in the “Special Matriculation” course allows a student access to academic and administrative resources to assist in the successful completion of Step 1. If a student has not passed Step 1 by December 31 then they are placed on an Administrative Leave of Absence until they pass the exam. If a student enrolls in Special Matriculation, they are assessed tuition and fees for this course. Students should contact Financial Aid regarding any change to their financial aid status. Students may not resume Year 3 course work nor can they participate in the Year 3 lottery until they have a passing score on USMLE Step 1.

Eligibility to Participate in Educational Program

Only those students’ who have completed registration for the academic year, including the payment of all required tuition and fees, are permitted to participate in school of medicine educational programs. Students with unpaid balances may be dis-enrolled from coursework and placed on a financial leave of absence. Students with holds will not be allowed to register or to participate in the scheduling process for the next academic year.

Health and Disability Insurance Requirement

All medical students are required to have health and disability insurance as a condition of their enrollment in the medical school. Following the lead of many other medical schools across the country, the medical school has negotiated a very comprehensive group health plan on behalf of our students and has made it mandatory at a market comparable price. This policy, through Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Michigan, is mandatory because we believe it to be the best value available in terms of the benefits package for the premium being charged. The benefits have been adjusted each year to meet the needs of the students based on student input through the Student Senate and based on an annual review of utilization. All students will be enrolled in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) Group Health Benefits Plan, unless they are eligible for a waiver as described in the health insurance packet.

Students who are found to be out of compliance with this policy will be dis-enrolled from medical school.

Prohibition from Participation in School Activities

To ensure success, students who are on a leave of absence of any type are not permitted to participate as Senate or class officers, hold leadership roles in student organizations, sit on medical school committees, participate in school activities requiring registration, participate in extra-curricular international travel projects or programs, represent the school at any conferences or participate in co-curricular programs.

It will be at the discretion of the various committees as classes as to how they wish to re-assign the duties of the officer or committee after their absence.

At the discretion of the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, students may be prohibited from participation in other activities not specified here.

For students who are on a leave of absence one month or less, their continued participation on committees or as officers will be considered on a case-by-case basis by the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs.

Dis-Enrollment from Coursework

Students who withdraw, have approved leaves of absence, or are approved for the Modified Program will be dropped from scheduled coursework. The School of Medicine may cancel some or all classes due to failure to pay assessments.

Seven-Year Limit to Complete All Degree Requirements

Beginning with the matriculating Class of 2015, there is a 7-year limit on the time that students have to complete all M.D. degree requirements. The 7-year limit includes participation in the modified program, leaves of absences, repeating coursework, and remediating USMLE examinations. The Vice Dean for Medical Education has the discretion to grant extensions.

Any leave of absence from the MD program will be included in the maximum time frame calculation when determining Satisfactory Academic Progress for Title IV financial aid eligibility purposes.

For MD/PhD students, the time working on the PhD is not counted toward the 7-year limit for the M.D. requirements.

Eligibility for Federal Financial Aid: Satisfactory Academic Progress

The Promotions Committee at the School of Medicine determines each student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) at least on an annual basis. Responsibility for the ongoing monitoring of academic progress of students is the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education or his/her delegate, who reports academic deficiencies to the Chair of the Promotions Committee.

The academic requirements for the M.D. degree include satisfactory completion of the curriculum designed and implemented by the faculty. The definition and implementation of the Schools’ Satisfactory Academic Progress policy applies to all students, and complies with the federal eligibility requirements through Title IV for students to receive federal student financial aid. Satisfactory Academic Progress is defined qualitatively and quantitatively (pace).

Satisfactory Academic Progress is defined as receiving at least a satisfactory grade in all enrolled courses. A satisfactory grade is equivalent to a letter grade of B and an honors grade (Year 3) is equivalent to a letter grade of A (federal guidelines require a C or better). Students with a satisfactory grade in all courses at a given level (M1, etc.) are considered to be making SAP. Students with unsatisfactory performance are reviewed by the Promotions Committee to determine whether they will be allowed remediation or will be dismissed from medical school. Remediation of failed courses may result in a schedule which deviates from the norm, as approved by the Promotions Committee. A student must successfully remediate all coursework in the order scheduled in order to be considered as making satisfactory academic progress.

The majority of students take 4 years to complete the M.D. degree. Students, with the approval of the Assistant Dean for Pre-Clerkship Education, can decelerate the first year of medical school through our Modified Program, which allows for completion of all degree requirements in 5 years. According to Federal Financial Aid guidelines students are expected to complete all degree requirements in 6 years (150%) from matriculation for eligibility. For students in the combined MD/PhD program, the SAP policy only applies to the time they are enrolled in medical school portion of training. For purposes of determining a student’s progress, Years 1 and 2 are combined and Years 3 and 4 are combined. Off-track students are further expected to complete Years 1 and 2 in three years, and to complete Years 3 and 4 in three years (totaling 6 years).

The normal period of enrollment at the School of Medicine is 4 years (4 academic terms). For customary academic progress a student will complete satisfactorily:

  • After the first academic term – 50 credit hours (Year 1)
  • After the second academic term – 101 credit hours (Years 1 and 2 combined) and pass USMLE Step 1
  • After the third academic term – 150 credit hours (Years 1 through 3 combined)
  • After the fourth academic term – 202 credit hours (Years 1 through 4 combined) and pass USMLE Step 1, Step 2CK and USMLE Step 2CS

Since the Promotions Committee may give approval for an individual student to repeat a portion or all of a school year, the required number of credit hours to be completed at the end of each enrollment period will vary in these cases.

Title IV Disbursement Issues and Financial Aid Probation

Students who are required to repeat failed coursework are deemed to not be making SAP and will be placed on financial aid probation as a condition of being allowed to repeat coursework. In the academic term immediately following the term where a student does not make SAP, Title IV funds may be disbursed under the following conditions:

  1. The student submits a formal appeal form to the Financial Aid, along with a personal statement explaining the extenuating circumstances which caused the failure to meet SAP and detailing what has changed that will ensure success in the future Office (forms are available at the Financial Aid website);
  2. The School of Medicine develops and submits a written academic plan that, if followed, will ensure that the student is able to meet SAP by a specific point in time (to be submitted along with the appeal).

Compliance with the academic plan is monitored on an ongoing basis. A student who does not comply with each remediation standard at any point during the probationary period will be suspended from Title IV financial aid eligibility at the conclusion of the probationary period.

Students re-establish financial aid eligibility by successfully completing each remediation requirement.

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