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Grading

  • Transcript Grades
  • Year 1 and Year 2 Course Grading
    • End of Course Grading
  • Year 3 and Year 4 Clerkship and Elective Grading
    • Overview
    • Mid-Clerkship Evaluations
    • Grading Written Examinations
    • Clinical Performance Evaluation
    • Determination of Clerkship Clinical Grades
    • Achieving a Grade of Honors
    • Achieving a Grade of Unsatisfactory
    • Remediating Unsatisfactory Clerkship Grades
    • Achieving a Grade of Incomplete
    • Achieving a Grade of Satisfactory with Commendations
    • Completion of Clerkship Assignments
    • Reporting Clerkship Grades
    • Timing of Make-Up and Remedial Examinations
    • Repeating Clerkships Due to Failed Clinical Work or Multiple Exam Failures
    • Special or Restricted Year 3 and Year 4 Programs
    • Grades in Senior Courses
  • Appealing Grades
    • Summary of Basic Principles
    • Appeal of Grades
  • Academic Probation
    • Purpose
    • Students in Year 1 or Year 2
    • Students in Year 3
    • Duration
    • Requirements of Probation
  • End of Year Comprehensive Grades
    • Comprehensive Honors in Year 1
    • Comprehensive Honors in Year 2
    • Comprehensive Honors in Year 3
    • End of Year 3 Standardized score
  • Overall MSPE Ranking System

Transcript Grades

For each course, one of the following grades will be placed in the transcript:

I = Incomplete will be entered if circumstances beyond the student’s control have prevented completion of assigned activities.

U = Unsatisfactory will be entered if the student fails to achieve a satisfactory grade. Failed courses that are repeated will retain the original grade of U on the transcript. Once the student has passed the repeated course the grade of S will be entered on the transcript as the second grade for the course even if performance the second time would have otherwise resulted in a higher grade.

S = Satisfactory will be entered if the student completed all requirements for passing the course

S+ = Satisfactory with Commendations is only available for use with the Year 3 clerkships (except Continuity Clinic Clerkship) and Year 4 Emergency Medicine. A student remediating a course or clerkship is ineligible for a grade of Satisfactory with Commendations.

H = Honors will be entered if the student’s performance (during Year 3-4 only) is determined to be meritorious. A student remediating clerkship is ineligible for a grade of Honors.

S* = Satisfactory upon Remediation will be entered for failed courses once they have been successfully remediated by re-examination.

Year 1 and Year 2 Course Grading

Course directors determine the grading requirements for an individual course, including the number of examinations, the number of questions per exam, and the relative weight of all components of the course grade.

End of Course Grading

Mastery of the content of courses is defined as achieving at least 75 percent of the available points (or the mean percent, whichever is lower), and all students at or above that level are guaranteed to pass.

Course pass rates are established by course directors, in consultation with the Director of Assessment. Course directors have the discretion to lower the pass rate based on the performance of the class on the examination.

The Year 2 Pathophysiology course is different from other courses in that there are two ways to fail the course. The first way is to achieve a percent score below the pass rate (like all other courses). The second way is to fail is to fail three or more units of the course. The course is divided into a number of units (e.g., cardiovascular, respiratory) and an examination is given at the end of each unit. Pass rates are established in the usual manner after each unit. The overall course pass rates are the average of the individual unit rates.

An additional difference is that a student who fails Pathophysiology, and permitted by the Promotions Committee to take re-examinations in the units must successfully pass each of the failed unit examinations in order to successfully remediate (pass) the course. Students who are required to repeat Pathophysiology must successfully repeat the entire course, not only the failed units. In addition to the pass/fail policy discussed above, starting in the 2015-2016 academic year students repeating pathophysiology will be held to an additional requirement. Specifically, students must also pass all previously failed units upon repeat. Students not passing all previously failed units upon repeat will be dismissed from medical school.

The pathophysiology course consists of 10 units. Nine of the units are subject based (e.g., cardiovascular, respiratory) and are graded according to the policy above. The tenth unit consists only of a comprehensive exam, which will be given at the end of the course. The National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Pathology subject exam will be used as the 10th unit exam. The exam, and thus the unit, is pass/fail and the score will NOT count towards a student’s overall pathophysiology percentage grade. A minimum passing score will be set by the course director. Students must receive the minimum passing score or higher in order the pass the unit. A failure of the unit would count towards the total number of unit failures in the course. If a student fails the course based on unit failures (3 or more unit failures) and one of those unit failures is unit 10, they would have to re-examine (if permitted) in that unit as well. Even if students pass their other unit re-exams but fail the NBME on re-exam, they would still be required to repeat the course.

 

Year 3 and Year 4 Clerkship and Elective Grading

The evaluation of Year 3 students is the responsibility of the School of Medicine Clinical Education Committee, which delegates that authority to the individual Year 3 Clerkship Directors. In turn, Clerkship Directors and Departmental Medical Student Education committees determine the clerkship grades for each student and recommends grades to the Clinical Education Committee. The Clerkship Committee reviews and approves grades on a monthly basis. Grades are then disseminated to students through E*Value.

Guidelines for evaluation of cognitive and clinical skills are established for each clerkship by the respective clerkship director and departmental education committee. These guidelines are detailed elsewhere in department-specific clerkship policies and procedures. At the beginning of each clerkship, students are informed about the specifics of the evaluation and grading policy. Each clerkship uses subject examinations purchased from the National Board of Medical Examiners. Course grades, at a minimum, are determined by written examinations and completion of clinical performance evaluations by supervising attending physicians and/or supervising residents. In some clerkships oral examinations, objective structured clinical exams, defined clinical exercises and/or research papers may also be a component of a grade.

Students should direct questions regarding the evaluation and grading system of a specific clerkship to that clerkship director. If further clarification is needed, contact the office of the Assistant Dean for Clinical Education.

 

Mid-Clerkship Evaluations

Clinical preceptors (faculty, attending physicians, or senior residents) provide students with a mid-clerkship evaluation. It is the student’s responsibility to solicit a mid-clerkship evaluation from those physicians with whom he/she has worked. The evaluation should detail your strengths, weaknesses, and any recommendations for improvement during the remainder of the clerkship. A form for accomplishing this evaluation will be given to you during each clerkship with instructions on when they are due to the clerkship director.

In particular, the clerkship director must be notified by the student’s supervising physician if (1) a student is not performing as expected at the time of the mid-clerkship evaluation, and (2) there is a concern that the student will not satisfactorily complete the clerkship. If such a mid-clerkship evaluation is received, the clerkship director or his/her designee will offer to meet with the student to discuss his/her progress and plan for remediation. It is recommended that copies of these written evaluations be kept by the student for future reference.

 

Grading Written Examinations

Exams written by School of Medicine faculty are graded based on established departmental criteria. The NBME provides each clerkship director with individual examination scores and the mean and the standard deviation for the NBME Subject Examination for the WSU School of Medicine cohort administered that examination. Each Clerkship Director and departmental Medical Education Committee decides how passing scores and honors scores for the written examinations are determined. The results of these objective examinations cannot be appealed, other than having the score verified.

 

Clinical Performance Evaluation

At the completion of each clerkship, the student’s clinical performance is evaluated using the Clerkship Evaluation of Student form by those faculty and/or residents who have worked with him or her. Students are evaluated using a 5-point scale on twelve different competencies.

Clinical Competencies in Year 3 Clerkships

  1. History taking
  2. Performing physical examination/Mental status examination
  3. Ability to synthesize data into assessment
  4. Ability to formulate a therapeutic plan
  5. Oral presentations
  6. Written documentation
  7. Technical/Procedural skills ( Obstetrics/Gynecology, Surgery, and Family Medicine only)
  8. Medical knowledge
  9. Self-directed learning
  10. Professionalism and relationship with team members
  11. Recognize a patient requiring urgent or emergent care and initiate evaluation and management ( Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine only)
  12. Give or receive a patient handover to transition care responsibly (Internal Medicine and Pediatrics only)
  13. Professionalism, ethics and interpersonal relationships with patients
  14. Professionalism, behavior, demeanor and work ethic

Additional comments by the evaluator, along with suggestions for additional development are also solicited. A student is not given a grade on the evaluation form, but faculty or residents in their opinion can recommend what they believe the student should earn in the comments section. A student’s overall clinical performance is determined by the Clerkship Director and the department Medical Education Committee.

Evaluation forms are completed by individuals who have directly observed the student during the course of his/her training on the clerkship. This could include faculty, senior residents, or faculty/resident teams. Exactly who evaluates each student is determined by departmental policy, as is the number of evaluations expected for each student at the completion of the clerkship. This will vary from clerkship to clerkship based on the educational structure and curriculum of each clerkship and each site. Students receive their clinical performance evaluations through E*Value.

Each department has discretion as to how to interpret the individual Clinical Performance Evaluations on a final Clerkship Grade Report form, e.g., assigning more weight to certain evaluations, simply averaging the evaluations, etc. The Clerkship Grade Report form is a summary of a student’s performance in a clerkship, and includes the summary of the Clinical Performance Evaluations and written exam and other assessment scores. Also provided on the Clerkship Grade Report form is the student’s written exam score, the overall clinical assessment (Outstanding, Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory), and the final clerkship grade. These Clerkship Grade Report forms are a “report card” of performance during a clerkship. Students are able to obtain a copy of the Clerkship Grade Report form through E*Value.

 

Determination of Clerkship Clinical Grades

While each clerkship is responsible for determining criteria for written examination grades, as well as final course grades, themechanismof how clinical grades are assigned is the same for all clerkships. This process is as follows:

  1. The evaluations of all faculty, residents and teams that have worked with the student are summarized on the Clerkship Grade Report form. The process of summarizing these evaluations, e.g., weighting certain evaluations, etc., is determined by and at the discretion of each clerkship director.
  2. Students are graded on 12-13 Core Competencies, dependent on the particular clerkship. The maximum number of points awarded for an competency is 5.
    1. For “Clinical Outstanding” – students must obtain a minimum of 85% of available points with no evaluation less than 3 on the final clerkship evaluation to be considered for clinical outstanding.
    2. For “Clinical Failure/Unsatisfactory” – A rating of 1 in any competency results in a clinical failure.
  3. The Final Clinical Evaluation for the clerkship is reported on the Clerkship Grade Report form. Generally an ‘Outstanding’ Clinical Evaluation is needed for Course Honors, although this is at the discretion of each clerkship director.

 

Achieving a Grade of Honors

  • Performance on both components of the student’s grade (clinical evaluation and written examination) must be at least satisfactory for a student to be given a passing grade. Honoring clinical performance does not compensate for a failing exam score, nor does an Honors exam score compensate for unsatisfactory clinical performance. Failure in one or the other category results in an unsatisfactory grade.
  • Performance on both components of the student’s clinical and written examinations must be Honors for a student to be given an Honors grade for the clerkship. In addition, the student must meet all clerkship requirements and deadlines to be eligible for an Honors grade.

 

Achieving a Grade of Unsatisfactory

Students will be given a grade of Unsatisfactory for the clerkship for any of the following reasons:

  1. Scoring below the minimum passing score on the NBME subject exam
  2. Achieving a clinical Unsatisfactory (as described above)
  3. Failing any other clerkship examination requirement

Students will be placed on academic probation for the remainder of Year 3 for:

  1. Two failures of the same NBME subject examination
  2. Clinically failing a clerkship

Students on academic probation will be required to meet with the Promotions Review Subcommittee to review the student’s schedule and remediation plan. Schedule changes to address failures will be decided by the Promotions Review Subcommittee.

 

Remediating Unsatisfactory Clerkship Grades.

At the discretion of the clerkship director, certain failing students may be offered the opportunity to repeat examinations (written or oral). Please note that if performance was notably poor, an Unsatisfactory grade may be given without offering a re-examination, and the student will then be required to repeat some or all of the clerkship. There is no presumption that each student will automatically be given the opportunity to repeat an unsatisfactory examination without being required to complete additional clinical time. Plans to remediate an Unsatisfactory grade or complete missing assignments must be made in writing by the student to his or her counselor.

If the student passes the re-examination, the grade will be recorded as S* (Satisfactory upon remediation). If the student fails the re-examination, the grade remains “U”, and the student will then be required to repeat part or all of the clerkship (including both clinical time and all examinations). The clerkship director determines the amount of clinical time required to remediate for an unsatisfactory grade.

 

Achieving a Grade of Incomplete

Incomplete will be entered if verified circumstances have prevented completion of assigned work by the student before the end of the Clerkship. Incomplete work resulting in an Incomplete grades MUST be completed within 30 days of the end of the clerkship. Failure to complete the assigned work within that time could be cause for either cessation of the student’s academic progress until the work is completed, and/or change to an Unsatisfactory grade.

Achieving a Grade of Satisfactory with Commendations

All clerkships (and Year 4 Emergency Medicine) have criteria for listing a student’s grade as “Satisfactory with Commendations”. Refer to each clerkship’s section of the Curriculum Guide for further information.

Completion of Clerkship Assignments

Students are required to complete all clerkship assignments, including Procedures and Diagnosis tracking (Px/Dx) before the end of the clerkship. The deadline for logging all PxDx cases is midnight Wednesday during the last week of the rotation. The clerkships will establish the deadlines for other assignments. If assignments are not completed by the respective deadlines, the student will be considered Incomplete. The Incomplete will change to a final grade when the assignments, including PxDx are completed and turned in.

Reporting Clerkship Grades

Students will receive their grade report form and clerkship evaluations through E*Value within six-weeks after completion of the clerkship

 

Timing of Make-Up and Remedial Examinations

Repetition of failed examinations will generally be limited to one of two time periods, ie., either at the time of a regularly scheduled examination or at one of two special examination sessions. Special examination sessions are scheduled in early January and early July, so students have adequate study time between completion of clerkships at the end of an academic year and the early July testing date.

Each department allows both special testing dates for repeating failed or missed clerkship examinations in addition to regularly scheduled examinations. The exact dates for scheduled repeat examinations will be established by the Assistant Dean of Clinical Education in consultation with the Director of Assessment. Once a student fails a written clerkship examination, the student, his or her counselor, and the Assistant Dean of Clinical Education will develop a written plan for examination remediation. Students must attempt to remediate failed clerkship examinations as early in the academic year as possible. In general, students with written examination failures during the months of July through November will re-examine at the early January special test date, while students with examination failures between December and June will repeat their failed exams in July or thereafter (at the regularly scheduled date for one month clerkships or at the established special examination date).

Clerkship directors have been instructed to release students from clinical rotations for the purpose of only these re-examination dates. No student is allowed to take a make-up or repeat examination while enrolled in another clerkship or elective. If a student intends to take a make-up exam at a time other than the special examination session (after consultation and approval from his/her counselor and Assistant Dean for Clinical Education), he/she may do so only if no other coursework is scheduled for the month.

For rising “senior” students, who have outstanding deficiencies at the end of June of their third year, no senior course and elective credit will be given until they complete all outstanding Year 3 work. A student will be allowed to complete an elective started in the fourth year at the time the additional Year 3 unsatisfactory grade is reported, but will not be allowed to begin any additional Year 4 course work.

 

Repeating Clerkships Due to Failed Clinical Work or Multiple Exam Failures

The Promotions Review Subcommittee may require students to repeat clerkship clinical time either for clinical failure of a clerkship or after an NBME subject examination is failed for a second time. The highest grade possible for repeated courses is a grade of Satisfactory (even if a student had initially achieved clinical outstanding).

If a student fails an exam a third time they will be administratively dismissed.

If a student fails twice clinically, including two different clerkships or failing a single clerkship twice, they will be administratively academically dismissed.

Students must satisfactorily complete all Year 3 requirements and pass all Year 3 Clerkships before starting and receiving credit for Year 4 course work.

 

Special or Restricted Year 3 and Year 4 Programs

The Assistant Dean for Clinical Education is empowered to alter a student’s program to guarantee the highest possible academic achievement and knowledge of the graduates of the Wayne State University School of Medicine. This includes, but is not limited to, alterations to help remediate academic difficulties and clinical weakness.

Possible actions may include:

  • Revise a previously approved Year 3 or 4 program to make up a deficiency
  • Take a prescribed program during their senior year
  • Take all electives or clerkships at a specific hospital affiliated with the medical school undergraduate medical education program

 

Grades in Senior Courses

Students must receive a grade of Satisfactory and/or Honors in all senior required and elective courses taken, even if the student elects to take more than five elective courses.

An incomplete will be entered if verified unforeseen circumstances have prevented completion of assigned work by the student before the end of the clerkship. An incomplete grade MUST be completed within 30 days of the end of the clerkship. Failure to complete the assigned work within that time could be cause for either a stoppage of the student’s academic progress until the work is completed, or an unsatisfactory grade.

If a student receives a grade of Unsatisfactory or Incomplete in a senior elective, it is reported to the Assistant Dean for Clinical Education for disciplinary or remedial action. The student must meet with Assistant Dean for Clinical Education before the elective is repeated.

A grade of Unsatisfactory received in an AWAY clerkship must be made up in the corresponding department at the WSU School of Medicine. All makeup work for unsatisfactory senior courses will be completed at the Detroit Medical Center or the Henry Ford Health System. No remedial course work may be done as an AWAY elective. A failed clerkship or elective can lead to having the students schedule modified by the Assistant Dean for Clinical Education modifying a student’s schedule. Any unsatisfactory clerkship/elective must be repeated successfully before May of the academic year.

A grade of Unsatisfactory in a clerkship or elective may result in a delay of graduation, withdrawal from the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP), dismissal from medical school or other disciplinary action as determined by the Promotions Review Committee.

Appealing Grades

Summary of Basic Principles

  1. Instructors are expected to evaluate student work according to sound academic principles and standards. Course expectations should be clearly specified and grades should be assigned without departing substantially from announced procedures.
  2. It is the instructor’s prerogative to assign grades in accordance with his/her academic/professional judgment, and the student assumes the burden of proof in the appeals process.
  3. Grounds for appeals are: (a) the application of non-academic criteria in the grading process, as listed in the university’s non-discrimination and affirmative action statute: race, color, sex, national origin, religion, age, sexual orientation, marital status, veteran status or disability; (b) sexual harassment; or (c) evaluation of student work by criteria not directly reflective of performance relative to course requirements. Students cannot appeal the results of an objective written or computerized examination, other than to have the score verified.
  4. These policy guidelines do not apply to allegations of academic dishonesty. Academic misconduct matters should be addressed as set forth under the heading Academic Misconduct Regarding Examinations.
  5. For Year 3 clerkship appeals students are strictly prohibited from contacting anyone (including site directors, attending physicians, rounders, residents, preceptors, or other faculty) other than the clerkship director with questions, concerns, or grade appeals related to the evaluation of their performance in the clerkship. A student found to violate this prohibition will have their appeal automatically denied.

 

Appeal of Grades

  1. Students should raise formal grade appeals in writing within 30 calendar days following official notification of grades. The student’s first appeal is to the Course/Clerkship Director with a copy of the written appeal submitted to the Assistant Dean for Pre-Clerkship Education for students in Year 1-2 or Assistant Dean for Clinical Science Education for students in Year 3-4. Prior to the student being informed of the decision, the course director will review the decision with the appropriate assistant dean to ensure that the policies and procedures guiding the School of Medicine have been followed. Further appeals shall be directed to the Pre-Clerkship Education Committee for students in Year 1-2 or Clinical Science Education Committee for students in Years 3-4, and then to the Vice Dean for Medical Education or his/her designee.
  2. The decision by the Course/Clerkship Director and Assistant Dean shall be sent to the student in writing within ten days of receiving the appeal, with a copy of the decision sent to the appropriate assistant dean. If the issue is unresolved, the student may, within ten business days, appeal in writing to the Course Directors’ committee for students in Years 1-2 or Clinical Education Committee for students in Years 3-4.
  3. Students shall be notified in writing of the decision by the Pre-Clerkship Education Committee or Clinical Education Committee regarding the appeal within thirty calendar days of its receipt.
  4. Students who are dissatisfied with the decision by the Pre-Clerkship Education Committee or Clinical Education Committee as stated in writing may write a formal appeal to the Vice Dean for Medical Education or her/his designee within ten business days of having received the Basic Science or Clinical Education Committee decision. This decision is final at the medical school level.
  5. Students shall be notified in writing of the Medical School decision regarding the appeal within 30 days of its receipt.
  6. When the appeal procedures within the School have been exhausted, the student may request the Provost to review the decision on the record. Procedures for requesting a Provost review are published in the University Graduate Bulletin.

Academic Probation

Purpose

Academic probation is used to track and improve the performance of students struggling academically. No record of the probationary status appears on the student’s transcript. Academic probation is determined at each program level (i.e., M1, M2, M3, M4). Once a student on academic probation has satisfactorily completed all coursework at a program level, he/she comes off of probation.

 

Students in Year 1 or Year 2

The percent score obtained on an examination(s) allows a student to ascertain his/her mastery of the material. For a course with multiple examinations, a “danger line” of 70% is provided for each exam. The purpose of the “danger line” is to alert a student and his/her counselor that continued performance at that level places the student at risk for failing the course. Students at or below the 70% danger line following an exam or continued performance at or below the “danger line” will be required to meet with their counselor to discuss the reasons for their performance and assess the need for a referral to the Office of Learning and Teaching.

Any Year 1 or Year 2 student with one or more course failures at a program level is placed on academic probation and formally notified by the Assistant Dean for Pre-Clerkship Education. In addition, a student on academic probation will not be taken off probation until the requirements for that particular level (e.g., M1, M2) have been met and the student is promoted to the next year. Any student repeating coursework is automatically placed on academic probation by the Promotions Committee.

 

Students in Year 3

Any Year 3 student with a combination of two clerkship exam failures will be placed on academic probation and be formally notified by the Assistant Dean for Clinical Education. A student will also be placed on probation for a clinical failure in a clerkship.

At the beginning of academic probation, the student will meet with the Promotions Review Subcommittee. The subcommittee will consist of the Assistant Dean for Clinical Education (Chair), the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, the student’s Counselor, an appointed Promotions Committee member, and the Academic Support Counselor.

Academic probation during Years 3 and 4 can result in any of the following actions:

  • Monitoring of progress without alteration in the student’s program
  • Alteration of the student’s program, including a change in clinical site, the order of coursework, or the denial of permission to do away electives
  • Requiring additional course completion beyond the usual curriculum to remediate clinical deficiencies

 

Duration

Academic probation remains in effect until the student satisfactorily completes all coursework at that program level and encouraged to continue to make use of all school resources and maintain contact with his/her counselor.

 

Requirements of Probation

Written requirements of probation will be provided to the student. A student on academic probation is required to meet regularly with his/her assigned Counselor and the Academic Support Counselor within the Office of Teaching and Learning to discuss factors that might be having an impact on academic performance. The frequency of the meetings is determined by the counselor. The student will be required to meet with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs should he/she fail to comply with the terms of probation and be reported to the Promotions Committee. The Promotions Committee may deny a non-compliant student’s privilege to take summer re-exams.

Students on academic probation will be required to meet with the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs under the following circumstances:

  • Failure of a third course/clerkship
  • Non-compliance with the requirements of academic probation
  • Poor performance (likely failure) of a course being repeated

 

End of Year Comprehensive Grades

Students receive comprehensive grades at the end of Years 1, 2, and 3. A comprehensive grade of Satisfactory is awarded after a student has successfully passed each course and met all other requirements for the year. Students cannot achieve comprehensive honors if any course or clerkship is failed.

Comprehensive Honors for Year 1 and Year 2 is determined by the weighted average of the percent score achieved in each course. A student with an end of year percent score of 92% or higher will achieve comprehensive honors for the year. The Promotions Committee has the discretion to lower the honors rate below 92%. A student with an overall year-end percent score greater than or equal to 92%, but with course failure, is ineligible for comprehensive Honors.

The end of year percent score will be computed for all students once they have successfully passed all the requirements for that specific academic level (e.g., Year 1 or Year 2). The percent score a student receives on a remedial examination, or when repeating a course, does not replace the original percent score achieved in a failed course.

 

Comprehensive Honors in Year 1

A student’s percent score for Gross Anatomy, Histology/Embryology, Physiology, Biochemistry, Population, Patient, Physician (P3) and Neurosciences, and 25% of the percent scores of Clinical Nutrition and Genetics, are added together and divided by 6.50. A student, whose average percent score is 92% or above, receives comprehensive Honors.

 

Comprehensive Honors in Year 2

A student’s percent score for Immunology/Microbiology, Pathobiology, Clinical Medicine II, and Pharmacology, 25% of the percent score of Psychiatry, and 200% of the percent score of Pathophysiology, are added together and divided by 6.25. A student, whose average percent score is 92% or above, receives comprehensive Honors. Translational Medicine II does not grade using a percent score and is not included in the calculations.

 

Comprehensive Honors in Year 3

There are two different ways to receive comprehensive honors in Year 3. The first method uses the number of months of clerkship honors (e.g., honoring Internal Medicine results in two months of honors whereas honoring Family Medicine results in one month of honors). Any student with a minimum of 6 months of Honors in Year 3 clerkships receives Year 3 Comprehensive Honors. The second method uses the overall ranking system (described elsewhere). Any student who achieves Superb Clinical Skills (a score of 35 or greater), but has less than 6 months of Honors also receives Year 3 Comprehensive Honors. Comprehensive Honors are recorded on the student’s transcript. Grades for the Elective and Continuity Clerkships do not count toward Year 3 honors. A student who fails any Year 3 clerkship is ineligible for Year 3 Comprehensive Honors

 

Overall MSPE Ranking System

The ranking system used for the MSPE contains information about an individual student’s overall performance over the first three years of medical school. A system was developed to increase the competitiveness of our students during an increasingly competitive residency application process. The system uses two dimensions—Academic Performance Basic Science and Clinical Skills—plus end of year Comprehensive Honors, to arrive at an overall descriptive term (Exceptional, Outstanding, Excellent, Very Good, and Good) for each student.

Performance Descriptor Approximate Percentage Level of Academic Performance and Clinical Performance
Exceptional 5% Outstanding academic performance and Superb clinical performance PLUS Comprehensive Honors for all 3 Years
Outstanding 25% Outstanding academic performance and Superb clinical performance
Excellent 30% Outstanding academic performance and Proficient clinical performance
OR
Very Good academic performance and Superb clinical performance
Very Good 20% Very Good academic performance and Proficient clinical performance
OR
Good academic performance and Superb clinical performance
Good 20% Good academic performance and Proficient clinical performance

 

Academic Performance Basic Science (Average percent score over Years 1-2)

[(Year 1 percent score plus Year 2 percent score divided by 2]

Outstanding Academic Performance ≥ 84% (approximately 60%)
Very Good Academic Performance = 81% to 83.9% (approximately 20%)
Good Academic Performance ≤ 80.9% (approximately 20%)

 

Clinical Performance (Year 3 Grades Converted to Scores)

Clinical Performance is based on the grades achieved in Year 3 clerkships, which reflect a combination of clinical knowledge (NBME Subject examination) and clinical performance (evaluations). Clerkship grades are converted to scores, where Honors = 4 points, Satisfactory with Commendations = 3 points, Satisfactory = 2 points, and Unsatisfactory = 0 points. Each clerkship (grade) score is then multiplied by the appropriate number of months (e.g., honoring Surgery would be 4 X 2 = 8 points versus honoring Psychiatry would be 4 X 1 = 4 points). Clerkship scores are summed across all clerkships. The maximum possible score is 44 (which would result if a student honored all 11 months of Year 3 clerkships). Getting Satisfactory for all clerkships would result in a score of 22. Students who have failed a clerkship will get a score of zero for the clerkship even after the clerkship has been remediated.

Superb Clinical Performance ≥ 35 points (approximately 25%)
Proficient Clinical Performance = 14 to 34 points (approximately 73%)
Competent Clinical Performance ≤ 13 points (approximately 2%)

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